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Oklahoma State University
Center for Veterinary Health Sciences

Healthy Animals - Healthy People

All in the Family

Thursday, May 12 2016

dr. guthrie in vet med commencement precessional

Dr. Ron Guthrie started a family legacy when he earned his DVM degree from Oklahoma State University in 1966. His two younger brothers, Darryl and W. E., followed suit earning their DVM degrees in 1974 and 1976 respectively. Guthrie’s oldest daughter, Kimber, earned her DVM degree in 1998 as did her husband, Jim Giles. In May 2016, Guthrie had the honor to welcome one more family member into the OSU Cowboy veterinarian legacy as he hooded his great nephew, Andrew Willis.

“I grew up in Burns Flat, Okla., on a dairy farm,” said Guthrie. “I saw the necessity for veterinarians and about the age of 10 or 11, I decided that I would like to be a veterinarian. I was on the judging team in FFA and we made annual trips over here so I was already familiar with OSU. I was a football and basketball fan so it was the only consideration I ever had as far as where to go to earn my DVM degree. I had no idea it would start such a legacy.”

Following graduation, Guthrie served two years in the Army. He then joined a mixed animal practice in Woodward, Okla., where he worked for 38 years retiring in 2006.

“The highlight of my career was living in a relatively small community and becoming part of that community,” he added. “The friendships that you build and the service you provide whether it’s large animal or small animal. It’s just a great, rewarding career.”

Guthrie returned to Stillwater to hood Andrew and celebrate his class’ 50th reunion.

“Andrew was born and raised in Woodward, so we were very close to him. As he grew up, he started coming around the clinic. I didn’t know that I was going to get to hood him but I knew that he was going to graduate. It’s an honor for me to be able to do that. I think he’ll make a great veterinarian.”

Guthrie said the reunion has been fun, visiting and seeing how they have lived their lives.

“One of the challenges is just recognizing everybody after 50 years. I’ve seen one or two that I would not have known but most of us still have at least a resemblance after 50 years. I’m very thankful for OSU and the veterinary school.”

For more information about a career in veterinary medicine, visit www.cvhs.okstate.edu.